Superheroes And Humanism: Is There Such a Thing?

To cite a fictional character as a primary example for a serious discussion may seem to be, in some way or another, out of context, but for a self-confessed nerd like me, superheroes are and will always be part of society. We, the collective geeks and nerds, know all too well that they don’t really exist, but there is that certain “something” – a relief, or comfort, maybe – that people with powers, capes and extraordinary abilities were once our guardian angels.

More often than not, our concept of superheroes changes as we grow older. I grew up watching and reading X-Men, Batman the Animated Series, Wild C.A.T.S., Superman, the whole nine yards. Hell, I even wanted to be Zach the Black Ranger at one point in my life. There was no Internet, not social media, no “digital age” – the only technology that we had was the television, the radio, plus comic books, trading cards and action figures to fuel our addiction. It was the golden years of geekdom, and it was good.

Fast forward to 15 years, my eye for superheroes has yet to fade a single shade. My Facebook page is filled with pictures of superheroes and yes, I have a Batman and Thor tattoo to prove my indulgence. But then again, age comes with wisdom. I no longer see them as someone who would swoop down to save the proverbial damsel in distress as the knight in shining armor, but a social icon who comes with a cult following. The more I read and watch their movies, the more I know that Bruce Wayne is a humanist and Superman once believed in something divine.