HAPI launches Humanist Manifesto infographic

Posted by McJarwin Cayacap | Posted on August 11, 2018

Humanist Alliance Philippine, International (HAPI) launched on August 9th of 2018 an infographic campaign on Humanist Manifesto III through its social media pages. The campaign is one of many efforts in the pipeline towards the fulfilment of the organization’s goal of a Secular Humanist school in the Philippines.

HAPI launches Humanist Manifesto infographic

The infographic cited the aspirations listed in the Humanist Manifesto III of 2003, successor to Humanist Manifesto I of 1933 and Humanist Manifesto II of 1973. The older manifestos have been declared historic, with Humanist Manifesto being a trademark of the American Humanist Association (AHA). HAPI International Council member Mark Richardson was a participant at the 77th Annual Conference of AHA in Las Vegas. See his report here.

Humanist Manifesto III declares that:

 

Humanism is a progressive philosophy of life that, without supernaturalism, affirms our ability and responsibility to lead ethical lives of personal fulfillment that aspire to the greater good of humanity.

The lifestance of Humanism—guided by reason, inspired by compassion, and informed by experience—encourages us to live life well and fully. It evolved through the ages and continues to develop through the efforts of thoughtful people who recognize that values and ideals, however carefully wrought, are subject to change as our knowledge and understandings advance.

Knowledge of the world is derived by observation, experimentation, and rational analysis. Humanists find that science is the best method for determining this knowledge as well as for solving problems and developing beneficial technologies. We also recognize the value of new departures in thought, the arts, and inner experience—each subject to analysis by critical intelligence.This document is part of an ongoing effort to manifest in clear and positive terms the conceptual boundaries of Humanism, not what we must believe but a consensus of what we do believe. It is in this sense that we affirm the following:

Humans are an integral part of nature, the result of unguided evolutionary change. Humanists recognize nature as self-existing. We accept our life as all and enough, distinguishing things as they are from things as we might wish or imagine them to be. We welcome the challenges of the future, and are drawn to and undaunted by the yet to be known.

Ethical values are derived from human need and interest as tested by experience. Humanists ground values in human welfare shaped by human circumstances, interests, and concerns and extended to the global ecosystem and beyond. We are committed to treating each person as having inherent worth and dignity, and to making informed choices in a context of freedom consonant with responsibility.

Life’s fulfillment emerges from individual participation in the service of humane ideals. We aim for our fullest possible development and animate our lives with a deep sense of purpose, finding wonder and awe in the joys and beauties of human existence, its challenges and tragedies, and even in the inevitability and finality of death. Humanists rely on the rich heritage of human culture and the lifestance of Humanism to provide comfort in times of want and encouragement in times of plenty.

Humans are social by nature and find meaning in relationships. Humanists long for and strive toward a world of mutual care and concern, free of cruelty and its consequences, where differences are resolved cooperatively without resorting to violence. The joining of individuality with interdependence enriches our lives, encourages us to enrich the lives of others, and inspires hope of attaining peace, justice, and opportunity for all.

Working to benefit society maximizes individual happiness. Progressive cultures have worked to free humanity from the brutalities of mere survival and to reduce suffering, improve society, and develop global community. We seek to minimize the inequities of circumstance and ability, and we support a just distribution of nature’s resources and the fruits of human effort so that as many as possible can enjoy a good life.

Humanists are concerned for the well being of all, are committed to diversity, and respect those of differing yet humane views. We work to uphold the equal enjoyment of human rights and civil liberties in an open, secular society and maintain it is a civic duty to participate in the democratic process and a planetary duty to protect nature’s integrity, diversity, and beauty in a secure, sustainable manner.

Thus engaged in the flow of life, we aspire to this vision with the informed conviction that humanity has the ability to progress toward its highest ideals. The responsibility for our lives and the kind of world in which we live is ours and ours alone.

 

The first of its kind in the Philippines and perhaps in the whole of Southeast Asia, HAPI’s infographic — titled “Are You a Humanist?” — has reached the attention of humanist, atheist and other non-believing organizations under the Beyond Belief Network of the United States-based charity group, Foundation Beyond Belief. The campaign has also been shared by LGBT Humanists UK Committee member Christopher Geake, along with other Filipino humanists.

HAPI launches Humanist Manifesto infographic

Tagalog-language version of the infographic is scheduled to publish on September 9th of 2018, only a month after its English-language counterpart. The follow-up infographic is expected to appeal to the masses who are perceived as the leading victim of religious ideologies and abuses in the Philippines and in many parts of the world.

For the original publication of Humanist Manifesto III, please go here.

 

 

The Author

 

 

 

 

 

 

McJarwin Cayacap

  • HAPI Metro Manila member
  • Web Content Editor-in-Chief
  • National Events Director
  • Public Relations Officer

Currently in between careers, he busies himself with anything that works for the good of humanity. Other than being a humanist, he is a realist, an art aficionado, a frugal foodie and a weary wanderer. He looks forward to working in the central government.

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